Small Feats 2018

Saturday 7 April 2018
Doors at 8PM / VIP Preview at 7:40PM
Largest Art Exhibit + Sale in Niagara
At NAC – 354 St. Paul Street / Downtown St. Catharines

We’re gearing up for the biggest art-buying frenzy and party of the year!

We put the call out to the artist members of NAC to create remarkable works of art and they responded!

While we’re still offering up sweet square foot works of art for $200, we’ve added an even smaller option to this year’s wall. Pick up 6”x 8” original artwork for $100. PLUS we’ve got some stellar BIG FEATS for $800! There’s something for everyone!



Expressions of Today / Expressions d’aujourd’hui

Expressions of Today / Expressions d’aujourd’hui
Opening Reception 
Thursday 8 March 6PM

Students in Studies in Arts and Culture as well as in French Studies at Brock University explore contemporary expressions in art and literature and create unusual stories mixing narrative and art-making. Their starting point is a graffiti artwork by artist Mat Vizbulis. /

Des étudiants en Etudes en français et en Studies in Arts and Culture à l’Université Brock explorent des expressions contemporaines dans l’art et la littérature, et construisent des histoires inhabituelles mélangeant narration et création d’art. Leur point de départ est un graffiti de l’artiste Mat Vizbulis.

Exhibition: Saturday Mar. 3 to Friday Mar. 16 / samedi 3 mars à vendredi 16 mars

Gallery hours: Wednesday 10-5, Thursday 12-9, Friday 12-9, and Saturday 12-5 / mercredi 10-5, jeudi 12-9, vendredi 12-9, et samedi 12-5

Opening Reception: Thursday Mar. 8 from 6-8 pm / jeudi 8 mars 6h-8h en soirée

Location: Niagara Artists Centre (NAC)

354 St. Paul Street, St. Catharines, ON

This is free community event!

You Can Never Go Home / Jennifer Akkermans

You Can Never Go Home
Jennifer Akkermans
On display beginning Sunday 1 April 2018

Flea Market Gallery

This installation, You Can Never Go Home, reflects the idea of irreconcilable, parallel homes, one that’s here and one that’s there. Themes such as longing and belonging, lost-ness, memory, nostalgia, loneliness, time, place, futility, family, and absence are all present. One wall of the gallery is filled with objects that represent my accumulated, obsessive search for belonging and a sense of home. It is crammed full of lightboxes, handmade houses, tools, building materials, jigs, a cuckoo clock, handmade objects, toys, mementos, suitcases, etc. There are windows and peepholes to look inside of, and still images and videos of rural landscapes and of myself attempting to build a home. There are miniatures, trinkets, material experiments and moving parts—an abundance of curious objects that I have both built and collected. The installation is crowded, raw, with works half-finished and cords tucked in haphazardly, yet it is also carefully arranged. Reminiscent of my grad school studio, it conveys a nervous energy, an anxiety, and a case of horror vacui (the fear of empty space).  As a maximalist, I fill every available space with the things I like, enjoy, and find comforting—things I have collected that make me feel happy and calm.  In a way, I am a bowerbird, creating a nest full of attractive objects that I have amassed in order to protect and insulate myself from the outside world.

In a sense, the works are an accumulation of failures, of my unsuccessful attempts to make myself a new home.  In contrast, one quiet piece, a small, white, rectangular box on the wall allows us access to a very intimate space through a peephole- my studio, where, almost unwittingly, I have made myself a home through the time and effort of all the failed attempts.



Development Proposal / Christopher Harms / Sept 2017

Development Proposal
Christopher Harms

Plate Glass Gallery at NAC

Development Proposal is an installation that looks skyward to what will be, by starting at the foundation.  Creating vibrant sculptures with plexiglass, the artist uses a light and colourful ascetic to represent the heavy construction excavators that shift and shape our urban landscape.  The viewer is invited to discover the unique reflections, surfaces, and layering in the work as this rough and messy ordeal is now transformed by a luminous filter of wonder at what the future may hold.

Chris Harms is a self taught, Toronto-based artist. In 2012, Chris began working with acrylic plastics and was captivated by their transparency, electric edges, and colourful shadows.  All pieces are hand-cut and riveted together, lending a precise yet human touch to the work.