Skawennati. Teiakwanahstahsontéhrha’ | We Extend the Rafters | Opening Fri 6 Sept 6:30pm

Skawennati.
Teiakwanahstahsontéhrha’ | We Extend the Rafters.

A children’s exhibition designed for kids aged 5 to 11
On display in NAC’s Show Room Gallery from 6 Sept-6 Dec 2019
Opening Reception Friday 6 September 6:30PM

The reception takes place Friday 6 September 6:30PM as part of the opening night of Celebration of Nations Indigenous Arts Gathering, which takes place at the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre 6-8 September and includes 40+ free and ticketed events. More information at www.celebrationofnations.ca


My name is Iotetshèn:’en, and I live on Earth—usually. Our planet is united under the Great Law of Peace. […] Earth has been attacked by more than one visitor from outerspace, and our harmonious way of life is being threatened. So for now, my home is this spaceship. We are travelling to the first meeting of the five nearest, friendliest planets in our galaxy. The goal of our mission is to create a union that will protect us from attacks and also help us share our very different knowledges. I have been invited on this historic voyage because I have a special power…

Thus begins The Peacemaker Returns, a futuristic saga set in 3025 yet firmly rooted in the ancestral Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) confederation story and featuring historical figures such as Tekanawí:ta, Jacques Cartier, and a president addicted to Twitter! This new machinima—an animation-style movie produced on the virtual reality platform Second Life—is the core of the children’s exhibition Teiakwanahstahsontéhrha’ | We Extend the Rafters, designed specifically for kids aged 5 to 11 by Skawennati.

Audiences of all ages are invited to (re)discover some traditions in the artist’s “museum of the future,” an original installation. A guided tour and a collective workshop in the form of an innovative board game will encourage young and mature viewers alike to (re)learn history from an Indigenous perspective and imagine how all people can contribute to the world of tomorrow, reminding us how History, like any other narrative, is a construction defined by those who tell it.

The Teiakwanahstahsontéhrha tour benefits from the financial support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec. This exhibition was produced in 2017 by VOX, centre de l’image contemporaine in partnership with Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC) and Obx Labs, with financial support from the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, the Quebec Ministry of Culture and Communications and the City of Montreal under the Agreement on the Cultural Development of Montreal, as well as the Community Fund for Canada’s 150th.

About the artist.

Skawennati makes art that addresses history, the future, and change from an Indigenous perspective.  Best known for her machinimas—movies made in virtual environments—she also produces still images, sculpture and textile works.

Her pioneering new media projects include the online gallery/chat-space and mixed-reality event, CyberPowWow(1997-2004); a paper doll/time-travel journal, Imagining Indians in the 25th Century (2001); and TimeTraveller™(2008-2013), a multi-platform project featuring nine machinima episodes.  These have been presented in New Zealand, Hawaii, Ireland and across North America in major exhibitions such as “Now? Now!” at the Biennale of the Americas, and “Looking Forward (L’Avenir)” at the Montreal Biennale. Skawennati is represented by ELLEPHANT and her award-winning work is included in both public and private collections.

Born in Kahnawà:ke Mohawk Territory, Skawennati holds a BFA from Concordia University in Montreal, where she is based. She is Co-Director, with Jason E. Lewis, of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), a research network of artists, academics and technologists investigating, creating and critiquing Indigenous virtual environments. She also co-directs their Skins workshops in Aboriginal Storytelling and Digital Media. In 2015, AbTeC launched IIF, the Initiative for Indigenous Futures; Skawennati is its Partnership Coordinator.

www.skawennati.com


Supported by the
Audrey Shimizu Memorial Art Fund

What’s Eating You / Shake-n-Make Collective / Flea Market Gallery / Aug-Nov 2019

WHAT’S EATING YOU?
Shake-n-Make Collective
Flea Market Gallery at
St. Catharines Factory Outlet Flea Market

On display every Sunday
from 18 Aug – 3 Nov 2019

The photo diptychs presented here combine Betty Crocker recipe cards with flash fiction. Embedded in the actual recipe are short stories – mostly about interpersonal relationships, family dynamics, disappointment, failure, shame, and awkwardness. And looking over it all is the quintessential ‘70s food icon rendered in a gilt macaroni portrait, with an upgraded title to suit our current era: Master Chef Boyardee.

 

ShakenMake (members: Claudia B. Manley & Liss Platt) is a Hamilton-based queer art collective whose work directly references the 1970s while elevating craft and subject matter beyond kitsch to speak to our current moment. Initially inspired by the discovery of a set of Betty Crocker Recipe Cards (circa 1973), ShakenMake artworks take the form of felt banners, embroidery, photo-text works, macaroni portraiture, beaded gas cans, installation projects, and more. We are particularly interested in creating tension between the domestic sphere (a primary site of crafting) and the public sphere (the world outside the home), undermining high/low divisions, and questioning what is appropriate as an art material.

period of adjustment / an exhibition by Carrie Perreault / Opening Reception Friday 10 May 2019 7PM

period of adjustment
an exhibition
by Carrie Perreault

NAC’s Show Room Gallery
Opening Reception Friday 10 May 2019 7PM-10PM
On display until Saturday 17 August 2019

Presented as part of NAC’s Homecoming Series.

Working primarily in sculpture and performance, Carrie Perreault balances resistance and restraint in onerous actions that recount long-term precarity. In making her work, she expends great effort to achieve minimal results. This isn’t about labour; she prioritizes process to reflect on systems of abuse and their connection to emotional and psychological experiences. Through gestural, often repetitive acts and narratives that resist closure, she alludes to complex trauma and its residual effects. By exploring, in a visceral way, failures, vulnerabilities, and the limits of her body, Perreault makes viewers keenly aware of their own.

Carrie Perreault is an artist based in Toronto and New York. Her work has been included in exhibitions and projects at Idea Exchange, Cambridge Galleries, curated by Iga Janik (2019); Deathnastics, as part of Gymsick, curated by Hazel Meyer and Lucy Pawlak, Toronto (2018); Hamilton Biennale (2017); Strange Beauty, Tangled Arts +Disability Festival, Toronto (2015); Treasure Hill Artist Village, Taipei (2014). Perreault has been awarded residencies at Open Studio (Toronto), The Banff Centre and Taipei Artist Village.

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IMAGE DESCRIPTION: There is an image at the top of the page. It is a close up photograph of a woman that’s cropped around her mouth. Her left hand is up against her lips and inside her slightly open mouth she is holding a dental flossing pick. The woman’s skin is white/ pink and the background is a soft blue.

This exhibition is partially accessible. There is ramp access at the entrance of the Niagara Artists Centre. The gallery is on the ground floor along with three non-gendered bathrooms, one of which is accessible. There will be an audio description of the exhibition available. If you have specific accommodation requests please get in touch with natasha@nac.org

 

XCAVATE: A vision in four gauges / Sat 16 March 2019

XCAVATE
A vision in four gauges

Workshop Presentation
Saturday 16 March 2019
Doors at 8:30PM / Event at 9:00PM
Niagara Artists Centre / Show Room Gallery

Featuring work by Matt Caldwell, Jennifer Judson, Katie Mazi, Lauren Mucciarone, Caleb Shaver, Evan Wallace, Connor Wilkes.

Long live the machines! Inspired by the languishing expanse of half-functioning analog media gear in NAC’s basement, rogue auteur Jonathan Culp and sonic outlaw Marinko Jareb go ‘digging’ with seven local artists.

For one night only – Saturday March 16 at 9pm, we present the result of this four week workshop: a projection performance crafted from film, slides and sound – media relics found, bought and sought, sliced, diced, slashed, gashed, and looped together into something exciting and new.

Come help us unearth these buried treasures.

Bar by Mahtay Café.

HOWLS / Kelly Kirkham / Plate Glass Gallery

HOWLS
Kelly Kirkham
Plate Glass Gallery at NAC
February 2019-April 2019

Howls were engineered in the year 2030 with the genes from owl, horse, macaw and shark to subsist on all types of waste plastics. The earth was experiencing a plastics crisis, and this was one of the solutions. Things went well for a while, as howls were docile herd animals.  They could survive in most climates, and were quite abundant near cities and manufacturing centres. However, around 2050 the Howls (also prolific breeders) developed a genetic mutation in their gut bacteria, that along with their highly acidic saliva soon led to them eating all sorts of other materials. Worldwide damage to city infrastructures and vehicles followed, leading to a massive cull of free roaming Howls, with only a few thousand left in zoos.

The last howl died in the San Diego Zoo in 2104.

– Kelly Kirkham

 

Check out more of Kelly’s work here