The Muted Note

The Muted Note
Extensive Autumn Tour for Multifaceted Poetry + Music + Dance Project
Based on Poems by P.K. Page

Wednesday 24 September 7:30pm at NAC
FREE EVENT

The Muted Note is a striking accomplishment. It ultimately resonates like P.K. Page’s galvanized language itself.”  –Stuart Broomer, Musicworks

Montreal composer and trombonist, Scott Thomson, and dance artist and vocalist, Susanna Hood, will perform The Muted Note, a suite of songs and dances based on poems by P.K. Page, 40 times and in 9 Canadian provinces in the autumn of 2014.

Scott composed the suite, a hybrid of jazz and artsong, and Susanna subsequently choreographed the songs on three other dancers with live music by Scott’s quintet, The Disguises. Susanna’s dances, like Scott’s songs, are made to be extended through improvisation, and the creative input of their superb collaborators will animate and activate Page’s beautiful verse, the core of this provocatively unconventional Poetry + Music + Dance show. (See personnel below.)

The stage work will premiere with a run at Toronto’s Citadel Theatre, 5-7 September, and then at Montreal’s Monument National, Studio Hydro-Québec, 2-5 October, a co-presentation of Tangente and L’OFF Festival de Jazz.

Apart from these shows, throughout the autumn, Susanna and Scott will tour extensively throughout Canada to play The Muted Note as a duo, the unconventional combination of Voice + Dance + Trombone, performing in cafes, art galleries, bars, dance studios, theatres, classrooms, lofts, and even outdoors. Susanna and Scott will be touring to support their duo CD, also called The Muted Note (&records 2013), and their presenters range across the fields of music, dance, and literature, as well as in universities.

Susanna Hood is an award-winning dance artist renowned, especially, for her synthesis of dance and vocal improvisation, as well as her beautifully crafted choreography. In performance, she sings the song lyrics with tremendous poise and intention, and animates them with her singular improvisations characterized by both their focus and wild abandon. As part of their duo, Scott switches freely from accompanying Susanna to soloing in a vocal, extroverted style reminiscent of his teacher, the great American trombonist, Roswell Rudd.

Patricia Kathleen Page (1916-2010) is one of Canada’s most celebrated literary figures, and wrote some of this nation’s finest poems. She was also a visual artist, working as P.K. Irwin, whose artworks are in the collections of major museums including the National Gallery of Canada and the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Grey Borders Reading Series

Julie Joosten, Jim Johnstone, Stan Rogal
Friday 25 October 2013

Grey Borders Reading Series is following up September with another fantastic lineup of poetic talent! Come and join us for this great event featuring the writing of:

Julie Joosten:
Julie Joosten is a graduate student at Cornell University. She lives in Toronto. Her poems and reviews can be read in Jacket 2, Tarpaulin Sky, the Malahat Review, and The Fiddlehead. Light Light is her first book.

Jim Johnstone:
Jim Johnstone is the author of three books of poetry, including Sunday, the locusts (Tightrope Books, 2011) and Patternicity (Nightwood Editions, 2010). Frog Hollow Press published his latest chapbook, Epoch, in 2013. He’s the former winner of a CBC Literary Award, Matrix Magazine’s Lit-Pop Award and The Fiddlehead’s Ralph Gustafson Poetry Prize. Currently, he’s the Poetry Editor at Palimpsest Press, and an Associate Editor at Representative Poetry Online.

Stan Rogal:
Stan Rogal has published in numerous magazines and anthologies in Canada, the US and Europe, some in translation. He is the author of 18 books: 4 novels, 3 short story and 11 poetry collections. He is also a produced playwright. His lates book is “Love’s Not The Way To” a haiku series dedicated to the life and work of American humourist Richard Brautigan. He’ll have a new short story collection appearing in Spring, 2014.

Grey Borders Reading Series

Grey Borders Reading Series presents
TROLL-THREAD | AVANT-GARDEN | FERNO HOUSE
FRIDAY 16 NOVEMBER 7:30PM

Troll-Thread | Buffalo-based publishing collective, featuring
HOLLY MELGARD, CHRIS SYLVESTER, DIVYA VICTOR, JOEY YEAROUS-ALGOZIN

Avant-Garden | Toronto’s formidable performance-based reading series, featuring
SHANNON MAGUIRE, LIZ HOWARD, FENN STEWART

Ferno House | Toronto-based micropress featuring
MAT LAPORTE

Niagara Artists Centre | 354 St. Paul Street St. Catharines
Free event! Donations encouraged.

Grey Borders Reading Series

Grey Borders Reading Series presents…
Dennis Lee | Leigh Kotsilidis | Matthew Tierney

Friday 21 September 2012
Doors at 7:00 pm
Readings at 7:30 pm
No cover, donations encouraged.

DENNIS LEE is Toronto’s first Poet Laureate, an Officer of the Order of Canada, and his poetry is anthologized and read around the world. He is the author of timeless children’s collections, such as Alligator Pie, and numerous books for adults including Civil Elegies, which won the Governor General’s Literary Award. His most recent collection of poems is Testament.

MATTHEW TIERNEY is the author of two previous books of poetry. His second, The Hayflick Limit, was shortlisted for a Trillium Book Award. He is a former recipient of the K.M. Hunter Award, and has placed his poems in numerous journals and magazines across Canada. His new book is Probably Inevitable, high-energy poems riddled with wit and legerdemain and jolted by the philosophy and science of time. He lives in Toronto.

LEIGH KOTSILIDIS grew up in Niagara Falls, Ontario. Her poems have appeared in several literary journals including The Fiddlehead, Prism international and Prairie Fire; and have been anthologized in publications I.V. Lounge Nights, This Grace and The Hoodoo You Do So Well. In 2009 and 2010 she was selected as a finalist for the CBC Literary Awards. She is also co-founder of littlefishcartpress. Her debut poetry collection is Hypotheticals, a book that American Scientist said represents ‘the best – which is to say, the smartest – in a new kind of poetry, steeped in science, relentlessly questioning its foundation and hardly concerned about where that leaves poetic tradition.’